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Personal Independence Payment

CONTENTS

Introduction.. 4

1. What is PIP?. 4

2. Timeline for the introduction of PIP. 4

3. Arrangements for those not of working age. 5

. 5

4. General conditions of entitlement. 6

7

5. Determining entitlement. 8

. 10

6. Criteria for those assessing level of each component. 10

. 12

7. The PIP claim process. 12

.. 13

. 14

8. Appeal rights. 15

9. Reassessment of awards. 15

10. Assessment of existing DLA claims. 15

. 16

11. Self selection.. 16

12. Some definitions of terms used.. 16

. 17

13. Legislation.. 17

14. Further information

Appendix.. 17


INTRODUCTION

As part of a wider reform of the welfare system, from 20 June 2016 Disability Living Allowance (DLA) has been replaced by Personal Independence Payment (PIP) in Northern Ireland as the main benefit paid to severely disabled people of working age.

In the rest of Great Britain (GB), PIP replaced DLA from 8 April 2013.

1. WHAT IS PIP?

PIP is a benefit for adults aged between 16 and 65 who have physical or mental health needs and have difficulties with daily living activities or mobility activities.

It is a non-means tested, non-taxable and non-contributory benefit. It is paid to eligible people of working age, ie to people aged between 16 and 64 who make new claims, report a change in circumstances or are found to meet the conditions of entitlement after reassessment.

Just as with DLA, a person can receive PIP whether he or she is in or out of work.

It is normally awarded for between one and ten years, depending upon individual circumstances.

PIP involves an assessment of individual needs and aims to ensure that financial support is targeted to those with the most severe disabilities or greatest need for practical help. Its purpose is to help towards some of the extra costs arising from ill health and disability. It is based on how a person’s condition affects her/his daily life rather than the condition suffered.

PIP has a daily living component and mobility component with a list of activities associated with each. A person can qualify for one or both components as long as he or she satisfies the associated disability conditions.

PIP decisions can be appealed but will first need to go through a reconsideration process before the appeals process can begin.

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2. TIMETABLE FOR THE INTRODUCTION OF PIP

By now everyone in Northern Ireland who currently receives DLA should have had a letter from the Department for Communities (DfC), giving general information on the introduction of PIP, and stating that:

  • from June 2013, PIP replaced DLA for fresh claims for working age claims in GB;
  • in Northern Ireland, it was still possible to make a claim for DLA until PIP was introduced on 20 June 2016.

While the reassessment of those who currently have fixed term/indefinite awards (managed reassessments) was initially scheduled to begin in January 2014, this may now begin in December 2016 instead.

It is intended that, by October 2019, The Department will have contacted everyone still in receipt of DLA to explain the reassessment process.

Between December 2016 and October 2019, claimants will be selected for reassessment on a random basis.

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3. ARRANGEMENTS FOR THOSE NOT OF WORKING AGE

Only people who are aged between 16 and 64 on or after the date of its introduction in Northern Ireland can claim PIP. This includes those who have time-limited or indefinite awards of DLA.

3.1 Under 16s

DLA continues for under 16s, whether existing or new claimants.

Where a child under this age is in receipt of DLA, she/he will continue to be entitled until she/he reaches the age of 16.

As claims to PIP cannot be made until a person has attained the age of 16, the Department for Communities (DfC) plans to contact the child’s parent or guardian when the child is 15 years and seven months old to enquire if she/he intends to apply for PIP.

To facilitate the reassessment process, DLA may continue to be paid for up to six months following the person’s 16th birthday where confirmation is given that the person intends to make a claim.

For more information on DLA, visit Law Centre (NI) Encyclopedia of Rights, A.3 DLA and AA (www.lawcentreni.org/EoR/benefits-and-tax-credits/dla-and-attendance-allowance.html).

3.2 Upper age limit

PIP will not be paid to new claimants who are over the upper age limit of 65 or pension age – whichever is the higher at the date of their claim.

However, like DLA, all those already on PIP when reaching 65 or retirement age will continue to receive it.

Anyone who had a current award of DLA and is aged 65 or over on 20 June 2016 (the introduction date of PIP) will remain entitled to DLA, provided he or she continues to meet the conditions of entitlement.

People who are in receipt of Attendance Allowance (AA) at 20 June 2016 will not be affected by the introduction of PIP.

New claimants who are over the upper age limit (65) and have care needs should claim AA instead. For more information on AA, visit Law Centre (NI) Encyclopedia of Rights, A.3 DLA and AA (www.lawcentreni.org/EoR/benefits-and-tax-credits/dla-and-attendance-allowance.html).

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4. GENERAL CONDITIONS FOR ENTITLEMENT

To qualify for PIP a person must:

  • be aged over 16 and under 65;
  • not be “a person subject to immigration control”;
  • satisfy the ‘required period’ and ‘prospective test’ conditions (see 4.1 to 4.3);
  • satisfy the residence conditions (see 4.4 and 4.5);
  • satisfy the disability conditions for either the ’Daily Living‘ or ’Mobility‘ components or both (see s5. Determining entitlement).

People who have a progressive disease where death is expected within six months can claim under ’special rules’ (see 4.6).

4.1. ‘Required period’ and ‘prospective test’ conditions

To be entitled to PIP, a person must show that the condition/conditions giving rise to her/his claim have existed for at least three months (required period) and are likely to continue to exist for a minimum of a further nine months (prospective test).  

4.2 Linking rules

Where a person aged under 65 makes a claim to PIP within two years of the expiry of an earlier award, she/he will not have to meet the three months qualifying condition.

For those aged over 65, a claim will be linked to an earlier claim without the need to meet the retrospective test if made within one year of an earlier claim.

4.3 Arrangements for people in hospital, in care homes or in prison

Where costs are borne wholly or partly out of public funds, any person being looked after in a care home will lose her/his entitlement to the Daily Living component of PIP after 28 days but will continue to be entitled to the mobility component.

If she/he is either in hospital or in prison, entitlement to both components will cease after 28 days.

On discharge from hospital or release from prison however, provided she/he meets the other conditions of entitlement, a person will regain entitlement to PIP immediately and will not have to meet the three month qualifying period.

Where she/he first becomes entitled to PIP while in hospital or prison, benefit will not be awarded until she/he is discharged from hospital or is released from prison.

4.4 Residence, presence and immigration conditions

As part of the new arrangements for PIP, a number of rules will require people to meet certain residence, presence and immigration conditions before benefit will be paid. A person will have to show that in addition to meeting the disability conditions for entitlement, she/he:  

  • is present in Northern Ireland;
  • has been present in Northern Ireland or GB for a period or periods amounting in aggregate to not less than 104 weeks out of the 156 weeks immediately proceeding the day on which she/he claims. This will not apply where the person claiming can demonstrate that he/she is entitled in accordance with EU law and has a genuine and sufficient link to the UK social security system.

The daily living component will not be paid however, unless the UK is the ’competent State‘ for payment of sickness benefits under EU law.

Until the new arrangements are in place, it is unclear how EU law will affect the payment of the Daily Living Component of PIP;

  • she/he is Habitually Resident in the UK, the Republic of Ireland, the Isle of Man or the Channel Islands.

PIP is classified as a public fund. This means that people subject to immigration control will not normally be able to claim.

Notes: Where questions relating to a person’s presence, residence or immigration status arise, advisers should always seek specialist advice before helping her/him to make a claim.

4.5 Temporary absences from the UK

Once awarded, payment will continue for the first 13 weeks during which a person is absent from the UK.

Where a person’s absence from the UK is specifically for the purposes of obtaining medical treatment, the period for which benefit will remain in payment will be extended to 26 weeks.

4.6 Claiming under the ‘special rules’

Where a person makes a claim to PIP under the ‘special rules‘, ie that she/he suffers from a progressive disease and her/his death in consequence of that disease can reasonably be expected within six months, she/he does not have to fulfil the condition of being present in Northern Ireland for two out of the last three years (see residence rules mentioned in paragraph 4.4 above.)

In addition, the three months qualifying condition is waived. In these circumstances, the enhanced rate of the Daily Living Component will be paid automatically.

To qualify for the mobility component, however, the person must show that as a consequence of the illness, she/he also has mobility needs.  

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5. DETERMINING ENTITLEMENT

5.1 Framework of PIP

PIP has two different components. These are:

  • the Daily living component;
  • the Mobility component.

Each component has two rates. These are:

  • the standard rate which is paid where a person is found to have limited ability;
  • the enhanced rate which is paid where it is accepted that a person has severely limited ability.

All awards of PIP consist of one or both of these components which can be paid at either the standard or the enhanced rate.

The amount for each rate is set out in the table below:

PIP Daily Living Component   Enhanced

£82.30

PIP Daily Living Component Standard

£55.10

PIP mobility Enhanced

£57.45

PIP mobility Standard

£21.80

5.2. Factors considered to determine entitlement

In order to assess a person’s entitlement to PIP, the Department for Communities (DfC) considers a number of factors. These include:

  • disabled people must be assessed as individuals;
  • the focus must be on how a person’s illness or disability impacts on her/his daily life rather than on the condition itself;
  • consideration must be given to the individual’s ability to carry out key everyday activities;
  • the assessment must take account of a person’s physical, sensory, mental, intellectual and cognitive impairments and developmental needs;
  • it must reflect variable and fluctuating conditions.

The level of award made, ie the standard rate or the enhanced rate of either component, is determined by the number of points a person’s needs attract:

  • to qualify for the standard rate of either component, a person must obtain a score of at least 8 points;
  • to be entitled to the enhanced rate of either component, she/he must obtain at least 12 points.

A person’s entitlement to each component is measured by reference to a number of activities (10 for daily living, two for mobility), set out in the table below:

Daily living component (activities 1- 10)

Entitlement to the Daily Living Component is assessed across 10 activities.

Mobility component (activities 1-2)

Entitlement to the Mobility Component is assessed across two activities.

Standard rate = 8 points

Enhanced rate = 12 points

Standard rate = 8 points

Enhanced rate = 12 points

Activity

Possible points

Activity

Possible points

1. Preparing food

0 - 8

1. Planning and following journeys

0 -12

2. Taking nutrition

0 - 10

2. Moving around

0 - 12

3. Managing therapy or monitoring a health condition

0 - 8

   

4. Washing and bathing

0 - 8

   

5. Managing toilet needs or incontinence

0 - 8

   

6. Dressing or undressing

0 - 8

   

7. Communicating verbally

0 - 12

   

8. Reading and understanding signs, symbols and words.

0 - 8

   

9. Engaging with other people face to face.

0 - 8

   

10. Making budgeting decisions.

0 - 6

   

A complete list of the activities and descriptors contained in each component is included in Appendix 1.

5.3 Fluctuating conditions

If a descriptor applies to a person for some part of a day (for example the morning) then it is seen as applying for all that day.

Calculating whether an application satisfies the required period conditions (see 4.1 to 4.3) must also involve looking at how the person’s mental or physical health needs can fluctuate on different days.

The award of a descriptor is applied as follows:

  • if only one descriptor applies 50% of the time (based on a 365 day period) then that descriptor will apply;
  • if more than one descriptor applies over 50% of the time then the descriptor with the most points will apply;
  • if no single descriptor applies over 50% of the time but two or more descriptors added together would make up over the required number of days then the descriptor that applies most often will apply. In the case of two or more descriptors applying on the same number of days, the highest scoring one may be used.

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6. CRITERIA FOR ASSESSING LEVEL OF EACH COMPONENT

6.1 Points and descriptors

Just as a person’s Limited Capability for Work (LCW) is measured by reference to a range of activities and descriptors for Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) purposes, a similar approach is adopted when assessing entitlement to PIP.

The assessment criteria cover ten activities to assess a person’s need for help with activities of daily living and two further activities to address any mobility needs he or she might have. Under each activity, a series of descriptors form the basis of the assessment.   Each descriptor has a points’ score which is intended to reflect a person’s level of ability within the activity.

Entitlement to PIP is determined by reference to the scores obtained which in turn enable the Decision Maker to decide which level of each component should be awarded.

In relation to both the Daily Living and the Mobility components, points are awarded on the basis of a person’s need.

For the Daily Living component, the standard rate will be paid if a person scores at least 8 points and the enhanced rate is payable for a score of 12 or more, based on adding together all the scores under the daily living activities.

6.2 Aids and appliances

Aids and appliances are defined in section 12. Some definitions of terms used.

Activities within the Daily Living component are to be assessed taking into account any aid or appliance which is normally worn or used, or which the person could reasonably be expected to wear or use. If the person needs to use an aid or appliance in order to undertake any activity however, this can help him/her score points.

An example of where a person might qualify for either the standard or the enhanced rate of the Daily Living component by highlighting her/his need to use an aid or appliance:

  • Preparing Food (activity 1);
  • Taking Nutrition (activity 2);
  • Washing and Bathing, (activity 4);
  • Managing toilet needs or incontinence, (activity 5);
  • Dressing and undressing, (activity 6); and
  • Communicating verbally (activity 7).

She/he could score 2 points for each of the activities which apply, giving a possible total of twelve points. (Managing therapy or monitoring a health condition (activity 3) could produce one more point to add to the overall total of points required).

Similarly, for the Mobility component, a person will need to score at least 8 points for the standard rate and at least 12 points if she/he is to qualify for the enhanced rate, based on the total number of points scored under the Mobility activities.

An example of how a person might qualify for the standard rate of the Mobility component is where she/he requires supervision, prompting or a support dog to follow a journey to an “unfamiliar destination”. In this instance, she/he would attract 8 points and so would qualify. Similarly, where a person can show that she/he “cannot follow any journey because it would cause overwhelming psychological distress”, acceptance of the relevance of this descriptor would attract 10 points so meaning, here again, the person would be entitled to the standard rate.

A person who needs either supervision, prompting or a support dog to follow a journey to a “familiar destination” would score 12 points and in so scoring, would qualify for the enhanced rate of the Mobility component.

The policy intention behind this method of assessment is that the activities are designed to be objective and are intended to take account of fluctuations in a person’s condition.

  • Only one descriptor will apply per activity;
  • Where one descriptor applies on over half the days in the relevant period, it is awarded;
  • If two descriptors under the same activity apply however, the descriptor which applies most often is awarded.

If none of the descriptors apply over half the year but adding two or more together would show that a person had needs over half the days, then it would be arguable that the descriptor which applies most of the time should be awarded even if this means that a lower number of points would be awarded.

An example of how this principle is to be applied in practice is where a person has needs which appear to fall within two or more descriptors. If descriptor (b) in an activity applies on one day a week, descriptor (c) applies on two days a week and descriptor (e) applies on one day per week, the points score for descriptor (c) would be used even though none of the descriptors in the said activity applies for 50% of the time.

Further, as it will be possible to add points together from the various activities, this may assist a person qualify for PIP by combining supervision and attention needs as well as day and night time needs.

6.3 Other factors to be taken into account

Other factors to be taken into account when considering which activities and descriptors are relevant include whether a person can perform an activity:

  • reliably;
  • repeatedly;
  • safely; and
  • in a timely manner.

If a person is unable to complete an activity in this way, that person should be considered unable to complete it and score the relevant number of points.

As the above factors have not been specifically defined in legislation, there may be scope for advisers to argue that while a person can perform a certain activity, her/his ability to do so cannot be described as being in a manner that would pass any or all of these objective tests. 

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7. THE PIP CLAIM PROCESS

There are five key stages to making a claim to PIP. These are:

7.1 Thinking about claiming

Information about PIP is available from a range of sources, including online, via leaflets and through support organisations. These will help explain the eligibility criteria and help a person decide if she/he wants to apply.

Existing DLA claimants will be contacted individually and will be invited to claim PIP after December 2016.

  • PIP claims cannot be backdated.

There is no provision for backdating a claim to PIP. Therefore, having first ensured that a person is entitled to make a claim, for example that she/he meets the prospective test or is not prevented from doing so because of her/his immigration status (see section 4. General conditions of entitlement), a claim to PIP should be made at the earliest opportunity.

Note: as noted earlier, where questions relating to a person’s residence or immigration status arise, it is crucial that advisers seek specialist advice before helping a person to make a claim to PIP.

7.2 Making a claim – PIP 1 Claim Form

Claims to PIP are initially made by telephone (PIP1 Claim Form), although eventually people will be able to apply on line. Paper claims may still be made but only in exceptional circumstances.

Additional support, such as provision of alternative formats, will also be available.

The initial claim will normally only require basic information, such as the person’s identity and contact details, payment information, confirmation of residence and presence in Northern Ireland, confirmation of the person’s immigration status, details of periods in hospital or residential care and whether the special rules for terminal illness apply (see section 4. General conditions for entitlement).

7.3 How Your Disability Affects You – PIP 2 Claim Form

A questionnaire (similar to form ESA50 which is used for collecting information for Employment and Support Allowance) will then be sent to the person claiming. The person will be asked to complete the form to describe her/his medical condition and explain how that condition affects her/his daily life, both on good and bad days and over a range of activities. In other words, the person claiming will have an opportunity to tell her/his story in her/his own words.

The person will then return this form together with any supporting evidence to DfC.

Law Centre (NI) advises that where supporting evidence is available, this should be submitted with any initial claim or as soon as it becomes available.

7.4 Assessment

Once a completed questionnaire together with any supporting evidence has been received by DfC, it will be passed to a Health Professional (HP), who will be asked to decide whether to request further evidence from any health care professional involved in the management of the person’s medical condition. This will help determine whether a face-to-face consultation is required.

Unless it is established that a person qualifies for PIP at this stage, ie the scrutiny stage, either because she/he has claimed under the ‘special rules’ or sufficient written evidence is available, she/he will be invited to participate in a consultation. This will take the form of either a telephone discussion or a face-to-face consultation with a HP. In any event, a person will normally be given seven days’ notice of the consultation.        

During the consultation, the person will be asked about the effects of her/his medical condition on a day-to-day basis. The person can be accompanied by someone who will be able to give additional information about her/his needs or just provide moral support.

Home visits will still be available and where this is required, the person claiming can have someone else present during the consultation for the same purpose.

If a person fails to provide information required or to participate in the consultation process without good reason, she/he will not be entitled to PIP.

It is very important therefore that DfC is made aware if a person is prevented from participating in the consultation process either because of her/his state of health at the time or the nature of her/his disability. This is because these factors may be accepted as ‘good reason’ for not participating.

After the consultation, the HP will review all available evidence and will award points under a range of activities. The HP’s report will then be forwarded to a Decision Maker so that a decision can be made on the claim.

7.5 Decision

To decide if PIP should be awarded and if so, at which rate, a decision maker will consider all information collected in the claim form, from the health professional and from any additional evidence provided.

A written decision will then be issued to the person claiming, who can ask for more information about the decision and if she/he disagrees with the decision, can ask for reconsideration.

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8. APPEAL RIGHTS

There is a right to appeal to an Independent Appeal Tribunal. However, the right to appeal is only permitted where a person has first had her/his case looked at again by way of a mandatory reconsideration.

In Northern Ireland, the Welfare Reform Bill 2012 enables Regulations to be introduced requiring a person to go through the mandatory reconsideration stage before she/he can proceed to appeal.

Where a person has appealed and wishes to be represented, the Legal Support Project at Law Centre (NI) may be able to help, provided a volunteer with sufficient capacity and expertise is available to take the case.

 

9. REASSESSMENT OF AWARDS

Once benefit is awarded, legislation provides for regular reassessments to be carried out to ensure that the level of benefit payable continues to reflect a person’s need for help.

The frequency of reassessment will depend on the individual circumstances of a claim, and is expected to be linked to the likelihood of change in the person’s condition.

While there will continue to be provision for indefinite awards to be made where a person’s condition is clearly unlikely to change over time, it is anticipated that awards will be reassessed after one, two, five or ten year intervals.

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10. ASSESSMENT OF EXISTING DLA CLAIMANTS

Existing DLA claimants do not need to take any action. The Department will write to individuals between August 2016 and October 2020 to advise that their DLA is due to come to an end, and to explain how they can make a claim to PIP.

10.1 Transfer to PIP

A number of safeguards have been put in place to ensure that those who have an existing award of DLA engage with the DfC in the process of transferring to PIP.

These are:

  • once contacted by DfC, the person will be asked to make a claim for PIP within four weeks;
  • she/he will be asked to return the questionnaire;
  • a reminder letter will be sent out after two weeks;
  • if a claim is not made within four weeks or a person has not asked for help with making a claim, her/his award of DLA will be suspended;
  • two telephone calls will be made and a possible house visit may be made to help the person complete the PIP form;
  • if a claim is not received within eight weeks from the date DfC first makes contact, a person’s award of DLA will be terminated;

10.2 Retrospective test

Linking rules will apply and a person who was previously on DLA within the last two years can reapply without having to fulfill the three months qualifying period.

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11. SELF SELECTION

Alongside the process of natural selection, where a person decides to transfer from DLA to PIP, provision has been made for him/her to do so from 20 June 2016. This is an option which people may consider taking if they think that transferring to PIP may generate a higher level of award.

Once a person self-selects, however, she/he cannot change her/his mind and de-select and stay on DLA.

It is crucial therefore, that an adviser clearly alerts any person considering opting for self-selection for reassessment of the consequences, ie:

  • she/he may lose money;
  • her/his DLA will cease.

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12. SOME DEFINITIONS OF TERMS USED

A number of terms referred to in the activities have been defined to limit the extent to which potential legal challenges might be considered. These include:

12.1 Preparing food

Means the activities required to make food ready for cooking and eating, such as peeling and chopping.

12.2 A simple meal

A cooked one-course meal for one from fresh ingredients.

12.3 Repeatedly

Means as often as the activity being assessed is reasonably required to be completed.

12.2 Safely

Means in a manner unlikely to cause harm to a person or to another, either during or after completion of the activity.

12.3 Cooking food

Cooking food means cooking or heating at above waist height – for example, using a microwave oven or on a cooker hob. It does not consider the ability to bend down – for example, to access an oven.

12.4 Aids and appliances

In certain activities, aids and appliances could, for example include any prosthesis, perching stool, lightweight pots and pans, easy grip handles on utensils and single lever arm taps.

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13. LEGISLATION

PIP is covered by Articles in:

  • The Social Security (Personal Independence Payment) Regulations 2013;

and

  • The Welfare Reform Bill 2012.

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14. FURTHER INFORMATION

Welfare Benefits and Tax Credits Handbook, 18thEdition, CPAG, 2016/2017, £61.*

Social Security Legislation, Vol 11: IS, JSA & The Social Fund(Mesher, Wood, Poynter, Wikely and Bonner) 2014/2015, £165 (including updating supplement in March 2015).*

*Both these books are available from CPAG, 94 White Lion Street, London N1 9PF.

 

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APPENDIX

DAILY LIVING ACTIVITIES AND DESCRIPTORS

Activity 1. Preparing food 

a. Can prepare and cook a simple meal unaided – Score 0.

b. Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to either prepare or cook a simple meal - Score 2.

c. Cannot cook a simple meal using a conventional cooker but is able to do so using a microwave - Score 2.

d. Needs prompting to be able to either prepare or cook a simple meal - Score 2.

e. Needs supervision or assistance to either prepare or cook a simple meal - Score 4.

f. Cannot prepare and cook food – Score 8.

 

Activity 2. Taking nutrition

a. Can take nutrition unaided - Score 0.

b. Needs either (i) to use an aid or appliance to be able to take nutrition; or (ii) supervision to be able to take nutrition; or (iii) assistance to be able to cut up food - Score 2.

c. Needs a therapeutic source to be able to take nutrition - Score 2.

d. Needs prompting to be able to take nutrition - Score 4.

e. Needs assistance to be able to manage a therapeutic source to take nutrition - Score 6.

f. Cannot convey food and drink to their mouth and needs another person to do so - Score 10.

 

Activity 3. Managing therapy or monitoring a health condition    

a. Either (i) does not receive medication or therapy or need to monitor a health condition; or (ii) can manage medication or therapy or monitor a health condition unaided - Score 0.

b. Needs either:

(i) to use an aid or appliance to be able to manage medication; or (ii) supervision, prompting or assistance to be able to manage medication or monitor a health condition - Score 1.

c. Needs supervision, prompting or assistance to be able to manage therapy that takes no more than 3.5 hours a week - Score 2.

d. Needs supervision, prompting or assistance to be able to manage therapy that takes more than 3.5 but no more than 7 hours a week - Score 4.

e. Needs supervision, prompting or assistance to be able to manage therapy that takes more than 7 but no more than 14 hours a week - Score 6.

f. Needs supervision, prompting or assistance to be able to manage therapy that takes more than 14 hours a week - Score 8.

 

Activity 4. Washing and bathing

a. Can wash and bathe unaided - Score 0.

b. Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to wash or bathe - Score 2.

c. Needs supervision or prompting to be able to wash or bathe - Score 2.

d. Needs assistance to be able to wash either their hair or body below the waist - Score 2.

e. Needs assistance to be able to get in or out of a bath or shower - Score 3.

f. Needs assistance to be able to wash their body between the shoulders and waist - Score 4.

g. Cannot wash and bathe at all and needs another person to wash their entire body - Score 8.

 

Activity 5. Managing toilet needs or incontinence      

a. Can manage toilet needs or incontinence unaided - Score 0.

b. Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to manage toilet needs or incontinence - Score 2.

c. Needs supervision or prompting to be able to manage toilet needs - Score 2.

d. Needs assistance to be able to manage toilet needs - Score 4.

e. Needs assistance to be able to manage incontinence of either bladder or bowel - Score 6.

f. Needs assistance to be able to manage incontinence of both bladder and bowel - Score 8.

 

Activity 6. Dressing and undressing      

a. Can dress and undress unaided. - Score 0.

b. Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to dress or undress - Score 2.

c. Needs either (i) prompting to be able to dress, undress or determine appropriate circumstances for remaining clothed; or (ii) prompting or assistance to be able to select appropriate clothing - Score 2.

d. Needs assistance to be able to dress or undress their lower body - Score 2.

e. Needs assistance to be able to dress or undress their upper body - Score 4.

f. Cannot dress or undress at all - Score 8.

 

Activity 7. Communicating verbally       

a. Can express and understand verbal information unaided - Score 0.

b. Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to speak or hear - Score 2.

c. Needs communication support to be able to express or understand complex verbal information - Score 4.

d. Needs communication support to be able to express or understand basic verbal information - Score 8.

e. Cannot express or understand verbal information at all even with communication support - Score 12.

 

Activity 8. Reading and understanding signs, symbols and words 

a. Can read and understand basic and complex written information either unaided or using spectacles or contact lenses – Score 0.

b. Needs to use an aid or appliance, other than spectacles or contact lenses, to be able to read or understand either basic or complex written information - Score 2.

c. Needs prompting to be able to read or understand complex written information - Score 2.

d. Needs prompting to be able to read or understand basic written information - Score 4.

e. Cannot read or understand signs, symbols or words at all - Score 8.

 

Activity 9. Engaging with other people face to face     

a. Can engage with other people unaided - Score 0.

b. Needs prompting to be able to engage with other people - Score 2.

c. Needs social support to be able to engage with other people - Score 4.

d. Cannot engage with other people due to such engagement causing either (i) overwhelming psychological distress to the claimant; or (ii) the claimant to exhibit behaviour which would result in a substantial risk of harm to the claimant or another person - Score 8.

 

Activity 10. Making budgeting decisions           

a. Can manage complex budgeting decisions unaided – Score 0.

b. Needs prompting or assistance to be able to make complex budgeting decisions - Score 2.

c. Needs prompting or assistance to be able to make simple budgeting decisions - Score 4.

d. Cannot make any budgeting decisions at all - Score 6.

 

MOBILITY ACTIVITIES AND DESCRIPTORS

Activity 1. Planning and following journeys     

a. Can plan and follow the route of a journey unaided - Score 0.

b. Needs prompting to be able to undertake any journey to avoid overwhelming psychological distress to the claimant - Score 4.

c. Cannot plan the route of a journey - Score 8.

d. Cannot follow the route of an unfamiliar journey without another person, assistance dog or orientation aid - Score 10.

e. Cannot undertake any journey because it would cause overwhelming psychological distress to the claimant - Score 10.

f.  Cannot follow the route of a familiar journey without another person, an assistance dog or an orientation aid - Score 12.

 

Activity 2. Moving around 

a. Can stand and then move more than 200 metres, either aided or unaided - Score 0.

b. Can stand and then move more than 50 metres but no more than 200 metres, either aided or unaided - Score 4.

c. Can stand and then move unaided more than 20 metres but no more than 50 metres - Score 8.

d. Can stand and then move using an aid or appliance more than 20 metres but no more than 50 metres - Score 10.

e. Can stand and then move more than 1 metre but no more than 20 metres, either aided or unaided - Score 12.

f. Cannot, either aided or unaided, (i) stand; or (ii) move more than 1 metre - Score 12.

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